Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme. Architecture, Philibert de L'Orme.
Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme.
Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme.
Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme.
Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme.

Architecture de Philibert de l'Orme [Title on illustrated added title page:] Oeuures de Philibert de l'Orme.

1626. Paris: Chez Regnauld Chaudiere..., 1626.

Thick folio in 6s, complete with 348 [i.e. 350] leaves. Title vignette (printer's device) and over 160 woodcut illustrations in-text and on folding leaves. Numerous ornamental initials head and tail-pieces. Numerous errors in numbering of the leaves. A handful of paper repairs to worming holes; one partially repaired tear on leaf 207. Old reversed calf quite worn, backstrip once richly gilt with red morocco label, now rather dull, crown and foot of backstrip and joints repaired.

§ The influential and extensively illustrated treatise by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme, one of the first in the trade to insist that architects needed both formal training and practical experience. This edition not in Fowler but mentioned in the entry for the 1648 edition (p.82). In this edition, as in that of 1648, the two books of the Nouvelles inventions have been added to the nine original books as Books X and XI. Fowler notes: "Of the three leading early French architectural writers de l'Orme is the most interesting and original... De L'Orme has been called the first modern architect." Hugh Pagan notes of his copy of the first edition (1567): "one of the most extensive architectural treatises of the renaissance period... Its author, Philibert de l'Orme (1514-1570), having studied in Rome in the 1530s, worked as an architect successively for François I, Henri II and Charles IX of France, but his most famous building was the Château d'Anet, designed and built by him for Henri II's mistress, Diane de Poitiers, between 1547 and 1552. In the present book he begins by discussing architecture in general and the qualities needed in an architect, and then turns first to building materials and construction, and then to the classical orders of architecture, including a French order of his own invention. The book concludes with a section devoted to chimneys and with some final remarks on architecture in general, including well-known woodcut illustrations of the bad architect (f.281) and the good architect (f.283)." (In this copy an early reader has charitably drawn eyes and a single rather shaky hand for the bad architect.). Item #123538

Price: $4,500.00

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