Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent. John Selden.
Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent.
Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent.
Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent.
Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent.

Mare clausum; The right and dominion of the sea in tvvo books. In the first, the sea is proved by the law of nature and nations, not to be common to all men, but to be susceptible of private dominion and propriety as well as the land. In the second, it is asserted that the most serene King of Great Britain is the lord and proprietor of the circumfluent and surrounding sea, as an inseparable and perpetual appendix of the British empire. Written at first in Latin by that late famous and learned antiquary John Selden, Esquire. Formerly translated into English, and now perfected and restored by J.H. gent.

1663. London: printed for Andrew Kembe and Edward Thomas, and are to be sold at their shops on St. Margarets-hill in Southwark, and at the Adam and Eve in Little-Britain, MDCLXIII. [1663].

Folio, [34], 176, 179-274, 279-470, 473-472, 485-500, [4], 37, [1] pp. Title page printed in red and black. First leaf contains Royal arms on verso. With license-to-print leaf after dedication. Leaf 3R4 is blank. Later half calf, marbled boards, a bit worn and knocked about but sound and with a great provenance. Bookplate "Bibliotheca Lindesiana" and the Crawford heraldic bookplate on the front pastedown.

§ First translation of Mare clausum by Marchamont Nedham, first published as: Of the dominion or ownership of the sea,1652. "Additional evidences concerning the right of sovereignty and dominion of the kings of Great Britain in the sea" (p. [461]-500), and "Dominium maris, or, The dominion of the sea" (37 p. at end) have separate dated title pages. As Barker observed in Bibliotheca Lindesiana p. 377: "the British Museum aimed at acquiring every printed manifestation of the human mind; the Bibliotheca Lindesiana only the best. Its books are now scattered all over the world: those who find them may reflect that they have in their hand part of the vision, aristocratic in the best sense, which inspired father and son, the 25th and 26th Earls of Crawford." ESTC R15177. Wing (2nd ed.), S2431. Item #122922

Price: $1,500.00

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