Old Papermaking in China and Japan.

Chillicothe: Mountain House Press, 1932. Tall folio, 71 pp. with 15 specimens of paper made from bamboo, mulberry, china grass and mitsuma, 3 specimens of bark, and numerous color and black and white illustrations. Three quarter buckram and decorated paper boards, printed paper label to upper board, occasional light foxing and offsetting from specimens, light wear and toning to boards, else fine in original slipcase. One of 200 numbered copies signed by Dard Hunter. A monumental history of the early centuries of Eastern papermaking, unprecedented and impossible to reproduce. Hunter wrote: “It is hoped that the pictures and the comprehensive captions will serve to show the actual process of papermaking in the Orient in years gone by, the design being to enlighten by the use of illustrations and by actual specimens of paper rather than by extended comment.” “The paper specimens, dating from the 14th through 18th centuries, are from China, Japan, Persia, and Tibet; the oldest were removed from block-printed books or scrolls. Each specimen is identified as to paper composition bamboo, mulberry, mitsumata. One is a leaf from from a gold-ruled 17th c. Persian manuscript on paper made entirely from China grass. The large Chinese characters and symbols were engraved by Lankes. Of the 200 copies printed, 50 were destroyed by fire.” (The Veatchs) Hunter’s work is of pivotal importance in the history of American book making. Immersed in the Arts and Crafts movement at Elbert Hubbard’s Roycroft company, Hunter went on to found the first handmade paper mill in America and to create arguably the world’s first “one man” books: books he printed on paper he had made with a typeface he had designed, cut, and cast himself. In Chillicothe, Ohio, he founded Mountain House Press and for the next 46 years dedicated himself to the study of papermaking, travelling around the world for his research and authoring 20 books on the subject. Item #106963

Price: $9,750.00

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